Husky Pug Mix: Meet The Amazing Hug Dog

A husky crossed with a pug is not a breed you may come across every day, but when you do, you will instantly love this breed. Affectionately termed the Hug, and for good reason. The Hug is one of those breeds that seem to inherit the best of both of their parents, to create the perfect family companion. This mixed breed is super friendly towards people big and small. Be warned – they love to share hugs or kisses! They are particularly patient with children and other smaller dogs so are an excellent family pet. 

Physical traits

husky pug mix Physical traits

The hug is not currently a registered breed, and as such their physical appearance can vary massively.

The hug is a small to medium size breed and height and weight can vary hugely. Average heights range from 10-24 inches, and weights can range from 14-36 pounds. They can live between 10-15 years. 

The hug is not currently a registered breed, and as such their physical appearance can vary massively. Some take after their husky parent, and others their pug parent. Their coat can be short- medium length and single or double-coated. They often inherit the Husky’s bright blue eyes, or may even have two different colored eyes, a phenomenon called Heterochromia. A hug can have the long snout of the Husky, or have a more shortened snout with all the wrinkles we love about the pug. 

Training 

Your hug is a born people pleaser and they are naturally very clever dogs. The Husky is known to be intelligent and this is often inherited in Hugs. It can make training a little tricky, so these dogs are usually not recommended for first-time dog owners, as their intelligent streak can make them stubborn in training. Pugs are notoriously clingy and the hug is no exception. They love to get attention and if not properly trained, this attention seeking can turn into cheeky behavior like chewing or stealing things around the home. A well-trained Hug will love activities such as agility. 

Grooming 

Depending on which parent your Hugs take after will affect the coat length and density. If your hug takes after the Husky side, they will have a thick dense coat that needs a thorough brush at least 2-3 times a week. If they take more after the pug side, the coat will still be medium length so needs a weekly brush as a minimum. 

The facial folds on your hug can harbor yeast and bacteria, so using pet-safe wipes to clean between the folds once to twice a week can help reduce painful skin fold infections

Nail overgrowth can be a common problem, so Hugs need a monthly nail trim to keep their nails short. 

Daily toothbrushing should be part of your Hugs grooming routine. Consider using dental treats or oral mouthwashes to supplement toothbrushing to keep teeth healthier for longer.  

Exercise 

husky pug mix exercise requirements

Exercise needs can vary depending on which parent they take after, anywhere from a short 30-minute stroll to up to two hours of exercise each day.

Pugs can be quite lazy in nature, so the Hug is often fond of lounging on the sofa. But your hug still needs exercise to keep healthy! Exercise needs can vary depending on which parent they take after, anywhere from a short 30-minute stroll around the block to up to two hours of exercise can be needed each day. Your Hug will enjoy playing with toys and other dogs at home to use up any leftover energy throughout the day. 

Health 

Pugs are prone to many health problems. Heart disease, dental disease, luxating patellas, and skin disease are all common. Because of their short noses, they also suffer breathing problems and eye issues. All of these conditions can be inherited in your Hug. 

Huskies are relatively healthy in comparison to pugs but are more prone to hip dysplasia, eye conditions such as cataracts, and skin disease. 

As you can see from this rather large list, the number of potential problems your Hug could inherit is large. Therefore it is very advisable to get pet insurance if you are considering a Hug due to the extensive list of hereditary problems, and that’s without the added risks of life’s little accidents! 

Breeding

Due to the size difference between a pug and a husky, breeding of these two breeds is considered at high risk for complications. Complications include being unable to birth naturally and needing a C section, uterine rupture, and death of puppies from lack of oxygen during the birthing process. We do not recommend mixing these two breeds without the help of an experienced reproductive veterinarian.

Feeding 

husky pug mix Feeding 

Always feed your crossbreed a high-quality, commercially formulated diet that meets AAFCO standards, and if unsure about brands, talk to your veterinarian.

Huskies can be picky eaters. There is the potential for this characteristic to be inherited in your Hug, so offering a variety of food from a young age can help overcome this fussiness.

Being fed treats can increase a Hug’s likelihood of refusing their main meal, so use treats sparingly and cut them into small portions so your Hug doesn’t get too full on treats. Treats should only make up around 5% of your dog’s daily food intake at most. 

Pugs are prone to obesity, so it’s important to measure out food portions for your Hug to stop them from gaining extra pounds. Always feed a high-quality, commercially formulated diet that meets AAFCO standards, and if unsure about brands, talk to your veterinarian or nutritionist for advice. 

Summary 

A hug will bring great joy and energy into your home. Their unique appearance and lovable personality will win hearts wherever they go. Their ability to spend all day on the sofa one day and then join in on a big family outing the next makes them the ideal household pet. Being aware of their health needs, and avoiding exercise during the heat of the day can help give your hug the best life. 

FAQ

What is a Husky Pug mix called?

A Husky Pug mix is called a Hug. 

Is a Husky Pug mix called a Hug?

Yes, a Husky Pug mix is commonly called a Hug, which we think is the cutest name for a mixed breed! 

How much is a Hug dog?

Hugs cost anywhere from $1000-2000. You may be able to find a Hug at a local rescue center, where adoption fees are much lower. 

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